No Nonsense March for Our Lives Protest Highlights Black Children’s Struggle with Gun Violence

By: Micaela Shambee– Editor, The Drive

Students and young people gather for the "March for Our Lives" rally demanding gun control in Washington
11-year-old student Naomi Wadler of Alexandria, Virginia, speaks as students and gun control advocates hold the “March for Our Lives” event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

–Three hours is all it took for the Parkland Students to get a powerful message across to the world: When it comes to gun violence, Black Lives Matter!

Black students were not used as tokens, or props on stage for their white counterparts to refer to as an aside. Black students voices were up-front and center.

Only recently have Black issues with gun violence been in the media, used as a counter-attack by NRA spokeswoman Dana Loesch. But the impressive #MarchForOurLives protest brought an incredibly insightful 11-year-old Black girl to the forefront.

Take a look:

“She stood as a representative of all Black children and spoke, without interruption, of the violence that plagues black girls.”

 

Naomi Wadler, an 11-year-old Black girl from Alexandria, Virginia, stunned the audience when she spoke of “the African-American girls who don’t make the front page of every national newspaper.” She stood as a representative of all Black children and spoke without interruption of the violence that plagues black girls.

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11-year-old student Naomi Wadler of Alexandria, Virginia, speaks as students and gun control advocates hold the “March for Our Lives” event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Wadler goes on to say, “I am here today to represent Courtlin Arrington,” Wadler said, “I am here today to represent Hadiya Pendleton. I am here today to represent Taiyania Thompson, who at just 16 was shot dead in her home here in Washington, DC. I am here today to acknowledge the African-American girls who don’t make the front page of every national newspaper, whose stories don’t lead on the evening news. I represent the African-American women who are victims of gun violence, who are simply statistics instead of vibrant beautiful girls full of potential.”

Though many people expected Black’s issues with gun violence to be ignored, as it has been recently by media and politicians, the #MarchForOurLives protest opted to confront the issues head on.

Know someone Black affected by gun violence? Sound off in the comments and let us know!

–And remember,

Stay informed, open-minded, and driven.

 

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